Prog-Sphere forums

Progressive Rock discussion groups

Follow progforums on Twitter

You are not logged in.

#2 2010-08-30 14:55:21

ProgSphere
CEO at Prog Sphere
Registered: 2010-04-11
Posts: 186
Website

Offline

 

#3 2010-08-30 15:29:22

TheDogman
Tanuki Supreme
From: NYC Metropolitan Area
Registered: 2009-06-24
Posts: 161
Website

Re: Interviews

La Torre Dell'Achelmista just agreed to one, and I might do it live once I get to Rome big_smile

Offline

 

#4 2010-08-30 16:16:14

ProgSphere
CEO at Prog Sphere
Registered: 2010-04-11
Posts: 186
Website

Offline

 

#5 2010-10-04 14:23:13

ProgSphere
CEO at Prog Sphere
Registered: 2010-04-11
Posts: 186
Website

Re: Interviews

Prog Sphere has completed an interview recently with Ron Jarzombek. Click HERE to find out what Jarzombek said about his career, upcoming WatchTower album, future plans, etc.

Offline

 

#6 2010-11-17 20:38:57

nick63
Member
From: the lovely South of the Nether
Registered: 2009-11-23
Posts: 55
Website

Re: Interviews

Hi there,
My friends at http://www.backgroundmagazine.nl/ added a review and an interview with Sean.

Enjoy,
Nick from the lovely South of the Netherlands.

Offline

 

#7 2011-01-20 09:48:57

ProgSphere
CEO at Prog Sphere
Registered: 2010-04-11
Posts: 186
Website

Offline

 

#8 2011-07-11 15:23:01

ProgSphere
CEO at Prog Sphere
Registered: 2010-04-11
Posts: 186
Website

Re: Interviews

Attention, folks! Here comes an interview with James LaBrie of Dream Theater fame, conducted by our special collaborator Mr. Michael Schetter from the recent edition of Night of the Prog festival. Prepare to find the answers to the intriguing questions about the band's new album and position they fell into after one of the co-founders of the band, Mike Portnoy, left the band. Enjoy!

http://www.prog-sphere.co....es-labrie/

Offline

 

#9 2011-07-18 13:30:17

ProgSphere
CEO at Prog Sphere
Registered: 2010-04-11
Posts: 186
Website

Offline

 

#10 2015-01-23 02:56:48

Svetonio
Member
Registered: 2012-03-11
Posts: 2149

Re: Interviews

An interview with Greg from NYC's prog rock band Pseudo/Sentai that I made in December 2014.


Some people think that flame is finnally gone out and that the prog rock have no future, also that the unsigned & unknow prog artists would not release they albums online at e.g. Bandcamp but just a few CDs for their families and friends that is great to be released and so on. What you as a contemporary prog musician think about new prog in general and at the end of 2014?




I'm confused about you saying things about artists releasing things at home and not on bandcamp. I have known some recluse type musicians that only want to share things with their families and friends, but that's not an epidemic. Most artists want their statement to be heard in some form. And even the recluse types have sound clouds and they will share them when they want.

For me to speak of specifically 2014 is kinda silly. I don't keep up with the years very often. I check the "Suggest New Bands" and keep my eyes mostly on the Avant Progressive forum that Udi Koomran runs, but I'm more often discovering bands from 2012-2013 because I'll get so focused on my own music. But seriously I am excited about music now. I think every year since the early days of online streaming music (2004/2005/2006) has been the best year ever. Every year you have more bands, more groups, and more music. Now quantity can't compete with quality, but I will say that we have both nowadays

So much quality exists in fact, that most of my favorite bands don't make any money off what they do. There is an explosion of quality music but the music business is shrinking slightly every year. Still, as a creator of music myself, I know that if I never have a child and focus entirely on music, I will be able to create enough to be proud of my output before I die.




  What about the lack of prog acts at the major festivals? What's the major reason in your opinion?




There is a lack of prog rock at major festivals because there isn't a market for prog. There are some great modern extreme prog bands playing at festivals because metal has a market. There are some prog/alternative bands that play at festivals because there is a market for alternative music and if you're able to create memorable, catchy riffs while keeping the prog mentality there is still a market. There is still a market for prog related jam bands like Eumatik, Umphrey's, etc but I'm personally not willing to sit through 35 bad jam bands for 4 good ones.


I know there are some prog festivals that exist, like Nearfest (not sure if this is still going on) and there's a cool venue called ProgHouse in New Jersey, but for me the festivals that truly matter are the RIO festivals in France in Japan every year. I would kill to have enough money to go to those festivals every year but I'm too focused on my own music. I don't even go to more than one show a month at most. Very disappointing to miss all of those experiences but this is the sacrifice needed to create an output while working a full time job.




Would you think that new prog will be regarded much better if some of the legendary, globallyknown, major festivals should be declared by the state as a cultural heritage, so the corporations that would be expelled from the organization of the festival and then the festival to be organized by, say, the ministry of culture of supposed country and financed fully by the state budget, and then, on that way, to make conditions that are needed that such festival host these carefully selected prog, psych and art rockers instead of just randomly choosen mainstream entertainers such as it is currently the case?



I have little trust for the way the world works. I only try to understand it so I can play along as much as possible without hurting others.

These festivals are tough to put together and I don't really know enough about the reasons why they are the way to are to really say too much about it.


Bansheeface is a great tune. What other surprises can we expect from Pseudo / Sentai's new album?



Thank you! I'm glad you like it. Well, I feel that the album is quite varied yet much more cohesive than most of the stuff we have worked on. This is album that took 5 years to complete. Somewhere on the internet there is version of the album that is 5 years old. I'll refrain from sharing that. It was essentially the first thing we ever tried to record as a band, and we decided our ideas were beyond us at the moment. So we worked. And now we are here.


So to truly answer you, there are plenty of surprises but I must mention one in particular, an amazing guitar solo played by our friend Sawyer "Oak Sawblade." He did some guitar work for us on the album because Scott was too busy working out the much detailed and complicated lyrics and I was too busy working with session musicians to learn every part. He rode a bus down from Berkeley Music School in Boston and did the extra parts for the cost of a ticket and some food. He even bought his own food sometimes! But I told him that he could write his own solo for a section of this song of ours and he really went all out.


There is also some mellotron, quick and insane keyboard parts layered quietly underneath everything, weird moments, epic moments, and vocal harmonies out the wazoo.


I also have to mention we just finished recording out 5th full length and are waiting for mastering! This will be a busy year!




  We are the at the end of year. The best prog surprise this year in your opinion?




Oh man... I'm not sure. This year was pretty cool for music. I'm going to say PoiL's Brossaklitt was absolutely amazing. It's so catchy and hectic at the same time. And if you listen enough to where you can sing along, you'll never have some much fun singing along in your life.


I will also mention A Lonely Crowd, who are ALWAYS awesome, and say I'm disappointed I haven't had enough time to listen to their whole album more than a couple times. Most of my music is listened to on the subway so I can't stream all the fun new stuff that I can't afford.


Also I will say that I submitted to the will of the Mollusca this year and cranked a whole lot of Slugdge. They might not be on progarchives but that's some solid prog blackened death metal. Very melodic and crushing, and every single song is about slugs. There are puns and beautiful lyrics covered in slime.


And seriously who can forget Knifeworld? Kavus Torbai is an idol of mine... I couldn't give enough respect to that guy if I tried.


There are many more 2014 albums for me that aren't from this year but that's just because I'm slow to catching up on things.




  The best prog debut this year in your opinion?




Umm... Wow... that's tough. I actually couldn't tell you off the top of my head. Most of the bands that I've loved this year had their albums released in 2012/2013 because I'm behind on music usually haha.


... Wow all the things I'm thinking were debuts are 2nd albums. Can I raincheck?


Thank you for the interview.




No problem! Thank you!

Last edited by Svetonio (2015-01-23 03:28:36)

Offline

 

#11 2015-03-20 05:04:12

Svetonio
Member
Registered: 2012-03-11
Posts: 2149

Re: Interviews

Napier's Bones is a prog rock duo from UK and I made an interview with them...







Where you live?

Nathan :
I've lived in the South West of England all my life and love it here. I'm on the County border of Devon and

Cornwall, both of which are rich in beauty, history and legend.


Gordon:
I'm from the North of England, quite close to "Bronte Country" so dark melodrama is in the water.



Napier's Bones is a prog rock duo. What are your influences, when you started to write the songs and how you get an idea to work together?


Nathan :
Gordon writes all the material for Napier's Bones and amazes me every time with his intriguing, dramatic and well-researched lyrics, often with deeper layers of meaning.
We have never met in person but first crossed paths via the music streaming website "Soundcloud" and soon realised we had similar tastes in prog. The 4-part mini-epic "Wistman's Wood" came about very naturally, Gordon sent me rough sketches to begin with, we shared ideas and stories and eventually the whole thing came together really well.
My Influences include Procol Harum, Camel, Caravan, Pink Floyd, Wishbone Ash, Barclay James Harvest, Hawkwind, Black Sabbath, Uriah Heep and many more.


Gordon:
I'd say my major musical influences are Yes, Genesis, Pink Floyd, Van der Graaf Generator, Bowie, Miles Davis, Bruckner and Bartok.




And then comes The Wistman Tales as a full-length debut album as well ?


Nathan :
After making "Wistman's Wood", I think we both knew we wanted to carry on working collaboratively, hence "Napier's Bones" was created and we set about delving into Gordon's rich back-catalogue of material to create "The Wistman Tales" debut album.



Gordon :
"Wistman's Wood" and "Lost & Found" were specifically written for our collaboration and the other tracks were older solo songs that we re-recorded


You majestically recorded an ocean of amazing mellotron sounds and your ship has entered so beautifully in retro-prog waters. Whether that 70s-like production (which some people have complaints just maybe because they prefer to today's production) is also designed for the same purpose of retro style?

Gordon :

Wow, quite a build-up!
If I had to choose my discs for a desert island then they'd nearly all be from the 60s and 70s with a certain

sound. Some would say it's analogue warmth but there's more to it than that.
There are lots of albums from the 80s that are musically fantastic and work brilliantly in concert but the

production tricks make them difficult for me to listen to. Jump cuts, DX7 orchestra stabs, stereo chorusing

everywhere,synth tom rolls, brittle synth tones - they sound more dated to me than the early 70s recordings.

With Napier's I use single microphones in front of acoustic guitars or tube amplifiers, often double-tracking and hard-panning. I use chains of analogue stompboxes in preference to amp sims or modelling effects.
I'm not a period-instrument extremist and don't intend to launch into any kind of polemic - I simply prefer those sounds and I play and write better when I'm inspired by sound.
I bought a hardware MS20 and play the synth parts live to audio tracks without Midi being involved.
The Mellotron sounds are sample-sourced but I pass the signal through a combination of analogue tube drive, EQ and digital tape sims to get the sound I like.


It's evidently that songwriting is not difficult thing for you, on contrary. And your songs are very melodic.

What about melody in the present day's prog rock - is it seems to you that the contemporary prog is moving away from melody?




Gordon :

I think Prog has always been a broad church with virtuoso and avant-garde strands in addition to the melodic, narrative based elements. I'd say Napier's sits in the mainstream dramatic storytelling tradition but if the action demands it then we can draw on all manner of heavy, angular and dissonant textures.




It seems to me that is pretty comfortable for you to work on concept albums?


Nathan :

Gordon isn't daunted by large scale projects it seems, he had a clear vision for Tregeagle's Choice from the start. I don't know how he does it !



Gordon :
Given that we're storytelling then longform tracks or song cycles seem to be our habitat. When Nathan suggested the Tregeagle legend then at first I imagined a 15 minute track recounting his adventures but when I saw the parallels with Faust and the possibility of our inventing a back-story for the man who became the demon then the song possibilities expanded exponentially.

Putting myself in Tregeagle's place and asking if I'd really be any better than him, or whether I'd do anything differently, that opened up the project for me.




You have shown great interest in mysticism. Tell us something about that?


Nathan :
I have grown up surrounded by the legendary landscapes of Dartmoor and Cornwall, it's simply part of who I am. "Wistman's Wood" is a real place I have visited many times and the story that Gordon created reflects some real life experiences from us both.


Gordon:
I'm hugely influenced by the 19th Century Romantic movement in literature and music, so spiritual mysticism is wrapped up in that for me.



What is your personally favourite songs from Wistman Tales and Tregeagle's Choice ?



Nathan :
"Wistman's Wood" is always going to be special to me as it was our first song we made on the debut album but I love all the songs on that album for different reasons. As for "Tregeagle's Choice" I'm not sure I Could choose a favourite but I suppose the dramatic finale "Eleventh Hour" would qualify as it has so many emotions and musical styles, multiple characters and intense mental imagery that stays with the listener afterwards. True "Prog Opera".



Gordon:
Such a tough question! I'd say "Wistman's Wood" from the first album with a special mention for "AD1069 : The Harrying of the North", simply because the events took place within a few miles of my home.


That surrealistic, stunning video you made for Room 237  the song is really fantastic. I'm a big fan of it! When we can except a new video?



Nathan : Thanks, I made the album cover art for "The Wistman Tales" using 3D fractal software and decided to animate an unsettling "flythrough" video for "Room 237". After setting it all up it took a continuous 48 hours to render the animation ! I dont have any plans as yet to make any more videos although you can find some other examples on my Youtube channel. I often dream of making a movie style video for "Wistman's Wood" and that song may be getting a remastered re-release later this year, so who knows ?.....










Your albums are available for free download at Bandcamp. What's your opinion about that huge self-releasing phenomenon that is embodied in a number of magnificent self-released prog rock albums recorded in the first half of the '10s, and what is your opinion about contemporary prog in general?

Nathan :
I think it's simply wonderful that an underground band like Napier's Bones has the oportunity to share our music to a worldwide audience without the need for managers, distributors or recording contracts. It's simply about the music, made and shared for the love of Prog.


Gordon :
It's fantastic that affordable recording tech, internet niche radio, websites and distribution have enabled artists to realise their ambitions and make their music available to prog connoisseurs. Providing both parties are willing to make a few compromises then it's a win-win situation




Do you make a plans for a live gig?

Nathan :
Ha ha, I think poor Gordon would struggle playing all those instruments at once !


Gordon :
Indeed, it'd be quite a tapdancing show with all the stompboxes I use.


What is your favourite album released in this decade?

Nathan : Most of my music collection is from the 70s, I've hardly bought any music from the last decade but I adore the "3000 Days" compilation album from The Pineapple Thief.


Gordon : I'd say Steve Hackett's "Out of the Tunnel's Mouth" is a special album for me with a mention for "Fain" by Wolf People.



Napier's Bones, thank you for the interview!

Nathan :
Thank you for your interest and support smile


Gordon
Thanks for asking us.



http://i66.fastpic.ru/big/2015/0313/1c/94524c34364c69c64cb9c69c3dff331c.jpg

Offline

 

#12 2015-04-17 02:56:57

Svetonio
Member
Registered: 2012-03-11
Posts: 2149

Re: Interviews

Gravitsapa from Ukraine is one of my favourite avant-prog & math rock bands, so I made an interview with the band's leader Sasha Jabowsky. Here's it.


https://f1.bcbits.com/img/0000986189_100.png


Where do you live?


I live in a country which is confusing for lots of people but also the one which should be known for each, considering latest events. It is Ukraine. City called Lviv, which is considered the cultural capital of Ukraine. Why? Because I live here smile









How Gravitsapa started?


In the official version of history written:

“Among first victims of Taksipods were single travelers, who were owners of teleportators. After teleportation into dangerous areas devices were working impermanent, because of the emissions of negative-fluid Taksipod elements. Dead  bodies  of  travelers  with distant  homo-spark had  been found in flagrante delicto. They were reduced  to  the level of organic matter. Humbled homo-race accepted its inexorable  demise in opposition with two enemies: one was destroying mankind physically, while the other(Hastrolaters) - mentally, imposing them image of primitive creatures, which have been vanquished long ago. No one was proud of his inner spark, until one of the disciples of Shubi-dubishvabra created Gravitsapa using pleksus of instant knowledge - a device that returns souls lost in space. It was based on the principle of plazmation, not gravitation. Device was introduced on Conclave convened by the Privy Council,  which rejected the gift  because it wasn't working on the principle of gravitation - the basis of Privy Council philosophy. Disciple also told that Hastrolaters and taxipods were puppets  of  third party. He shouted its name and disappeared because members of Conclave made an attempt to  kill him. Someone says that he attained theosis and still returns travelers home and protects homo-sparks with his own desciples using Gravitsapa.”

Well, in that way… nothing interesting, a typical story of any of the bands



What did you play before avant / math rock?


Before Avant / math rock we used to play Christian-indie-motherf**ka – I will call it exactly in this way (probably this term is local, so I’ll explain it to you, that we call the primitive Nu Metal like ‘mazafaka’ ). Back in those days our vision of life and music were different and all of us were participants of the Protestant Church. But after that period we were completely given ourselves into the hands of muse.


Your music is both energetic and spiritual. Where all of it did come from? What are your influences - not only in music, but in literature and visual arts?


My music was never played light-mindedly. It is always a spiritual process for me, I feel about it with trepidation. It is important for me to play an atmosphere music that will give an opportunity to the listener and to me to enter in different states of the consciousness condition.Speaking of energetic in the music, it is, I think, depends mostly on my nervous system. My temperament doesn’t suit to play post rock.I love all kinds of art, except dancing. In cinematograph I was inspired by sincerity of Jodorowsky,  craziness of Lynch, atmospheritc of Sokurov, conceptuality of Yevgeny Yufit and the monotony of Bela Tarr. If to talk about music, for the last half of a year I listen to John Cage, whom Shoneberg called rather an inventor than a compositor. While creating music, I feel also that a scientific approach suits better to me than emotional approach. It’s easier to feel the inspiration condition when I wish to apply some technic or scientific conception in music. I was never inspired by emotional experiences or love stories.From the literature I respect Frank Herbert, Philip Dick, I begin to discover Stanislaw Lem. I love the picture of Neo Rauch, Lado Pavliashvili, Pablo Picasso, starting to get modern art smile. But I think all the listed artists and writers didn’t affect my music. I think, the more people are closed to the world, the better it reflects on their arts.










Your tunes are very original. I guess it's hard to bear the burden of an entirely original music?


For some reason I want to be on the crest of music evolution. I understand that our music doesn’t get ahead of humanity for decades, but I never found it interesting to play something that is called ‘good old rock’n’roll’. I think I despise plagiarism too much, that’s why I try not to fall into temptation to become like someone else. But who exists without sin…I would never become a new Elvis or Fripp and if it happened, I would only become some Under-Elvis №665. So I’ll be better Sasha number one.










What kind of the audience attempt at your concerts?



As far as I understand, those are minority individuals, who don’t referring themselves to some groups or subcultures, But I do not know many of them, really…










Do you will tour Europe soon?



On spring 2016 we are going to be ready to our tour with the new band members. 4 talented introverts – I think it’s great!




http://www.progarchives.com/progressive_rock_discography_band/8908.jpg




What is your favourite prog band from the 70s?




I’ve not been listened prog band of 70th and prog bands in general only a little bit. In general, the progressive elements appeared in our music accidentally or rather not intentionally. Even thou I’m interested in King Chrimson because Gravitsapa was compared with them. I doubt then ‘who are they to be compared with Gravitsapa so constantly, should I listen to King Crimson and would they affect me?’









Is a new abum on the path?



The album is almost ready. But still I have doubts about releasing it in its current condition. I absolutely don’t know about people’s reaction. Most likely it is just going to be ignored. For the experiment I sent this album to a few people, but I had no replies about it ever since, they just keep silence. Maybe they think ‘he becomes totally insane’ or ‘what a piece of sh*t he did’. Nowadays, I’m the only one who knows the value of this album, maybe this amount of fans will remain forever. But I will tell you one thing to make an intrigue – there are rudiments of 2 styles, they could be developed in the future. I would call them “minimal math” and “post sludge”.










Thanks for the interview!


Any time, Svetonio.

Offline

 

Board footer

SiteUptime Web Site Monitoring Service
Powered by © Copyright 2002–2005 Rickard Andersson
Defended from spammers by Stop Forum Spam

SteveA's forums are free for everyone to use, however if you would like to contribute to the upkeep I would be grateful for any donation!